Category Archives: Political

Elections mess

Nitesh Chaudhary belongs to the 2K10/EEE batch of the Delhi Technological University/ Delhi College of Engineering. He many-a-times happens to board the same metro as me and that does lead to some fruitful-mostly-political discussions. He also has a knack to find people to debate with other than his batch-mates or people from his university or any other college for that matter. He doesn’t really blog, though he could be found here.

Here he talks about the ongoing Gujarat elections. Read on.

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Source: Google/Reuters
Source: Google/Reuters

Come elections, and we face a typical environment every single time- heated debates over the unsuccessful tenure of the incumbent government and the lack of choice for a better opponent available to the public. The Gujarat elections have reiterated my point.

What Keshubhai, Sonia Gandhi, Rahul Gandhi, and finally Modi have spoken about Gujarat have content beyond doubts. Modi asserts his success in metamorphosis of Gujarat from a debt laden state to one attracting international investors is unquestionable. Rahul calls it a success for the rich and a loss to the poor. Sonia and Keshubhai reiterate the echoes stating Modi to be a businessman with friends in corporate houses, and selling the pieces of Gujarat to the wrongful owners thereby denying the local public their right over Gujarat. The other claims include corruption levels in the state to be at an all time high.

The allegations have found support in the poor farmers and labour class, as they did in the 2007 elections. This makes one believe the incredible level of truth in politicians’ words, so what if it’s directed to the harm of their opponents.

The response to the allegations props out back and quick, not from the tongue controlled spokespersons but often the supreme leader of the crusade Gujarat government is led by, Mr. Modi. His view that allegations hurled at him come from sources that have epitomised the standards of corruption in Modern India- the leaders troubled by allegations of misappropriated properties by family members. This leads one to wonder, how correct our leaders sound when faced with charges accusing them of being at fault.

The success story of Gujarat has undoubtedly raised brows across the top echelons of technologically advanced nations bringing them to a cat-fight to push each other to share a shining Gujarat’s pie to their advantage. This is surely a thumbs-up to Mr. Modi and his comrades and deserves to invite applauds from his true enemies. Though it is hard to be seen in politics like ours, the sordid side of this success tale has been elucidated with discreet sharpness. The poor in Gujarat have not prospered the way others have, if not perished to the extent, the opposition prophesise. The truth lies in how our nation’s poor fare as a whole. It is a stark reminder to the Modi-opponents that the states ruled by them fare poorly, in fact poorer than Gujarat when it comes to measuring the success of ruling governments on the rural-welfare-scale.

Though the ethnic factor shall haunt the Modi government for its failure in bring succour to its deserved benefactors, all agree for now, that the Modi government shall return even against their wishes, at least for now.

One, when contrasts the governments, encounters a Hobson’s choice among parties to select from- those that carry out development of the infrastructure and people as a whole are often the ones associated with serious corruption charges, and ugly scams, and the others that do not invite the ire of public as corrupt one (though rare in our scenario), do not work at all. The still favourable choice between the two for the innocent masses is the corrupt but promising government and so the wheel keeps turning.

The fourth estate

Source : Google Images

Nitesh Chaudhary belongs to the 2K10/EEE batch of the Delhi Technological University/ Delhi College of Engineering. He many-a-times happens to board the same metro as me and that does lead to some fruitful-mostly-political discussions. He also has a knack to find people to debate with other than his batch-mates or people from his university or any other college for that matter. He doesn’t really blog, though he could be found here.

Here, he talks about the fourth estate, i.e. our media. Read on.

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It is said that “Power corrupts, Absolute power corrupts absolutely.” In my views, in fact, “Power corrupts, but the fear of losing power corrupts absolutely.” The first case is a universally accepted and observed cliché. The second is a more fitting observation in the top echelons of totalitarian nations, and sarcastically, in democracies like ours. The third, the ‘fear of losing power’ however is true for an institution that we have seen emerging in our neighbors only in the last couple of decades- our brute and unforgiving media.

It is widely accepted that the fourth estate (the first three of course being the legislature, executive and judiciary) has raised issues for the utterly impecunious that would have been nothing more than a molehill for our colored parties unless the elections arrived. The achievements have been tremendous and results received with open hands. From high profile murder cases to little tots slipping into bore wells to the most chided forms of terror practices in the society, the coverage have galvanized people once and again, bringing the general public under a common roof, which was unimaginable beyond religion and ethnic lines. A controversial leader of the ruling government may be grilled for hours without sparing him even for a gulp of water, let alone help from his cohorts. The issues are adjudicated without delays, and often turning the habitually reticent leaders (read suspects) to shout their minds out. The vociferous media, no doubt has been credited to exhume several covert actions of the ruling governments leaving them with no choice but chastise the ‘culprits’ (who otherwise would be protected favorites).

The positives, have sadly, not been the only arguments, for the fourth estate, as has been the scenario for the trio placed above. The media basking in a ‘ savior’ tag is far from visible. Surely, the trust among the four is cornered towards the Media, crucial lacunae have been difficult to do without. It has often been pestered for quickly disabusing one from one’s own beliefs. From apotheosis of anyone to reducing one to a flagrant ghost within a blink, the mercurial nature is clearly beamed.  The otherwise exacting job of theirs has often invited criticism for being out of context, at times motivated, mischievous and malicious. In the league for crushing its competitors behind in the ugly race of TRPs, the ordinary television channel has left no stone unturned.

 Though they have tried hard to thwart all attempts to clear air over contentious issues, innocents have been tagged contraband, silly rumors spread without responsibility, leaders and institutions misquoted and above all, the common man has lost scores of hours every week watching the useless gaffes aired in loops lasting hours at a stretch.  No doubt, gaffes are a personal favorite with our moderators on popular television channels, but incredibly they also fetch them good TRPs, thanks to our sordid interests in this nincompoop.

But after all the pestering, comes the retrospection of how we let ourselves get influenced by a section of profit-making private institutions whom we consider nothing more than TRP mongers.

The information age is surely in its fastest ever era, for one wonders how the world shall be in eons to follow. One only hopes the times to come shall be milder, and the celebrated fourth estate keeps a check on the other three, for that is primarily intended. We hope that the ‘ugly truth’ of the “fear of losing power” does not hold true in times to come with the estates experiencing changes for the good.

Anna and Gandhi

Nitesh Chaudhary belongs to the 2K10/EEE batch of the Delhi Technological University/ Delhi College of Engineering. He many-a-times happens to board the same metro as me and that does lead to some fruitful-mostly-political discussions. He also has a knack to find people to debate with other than his batch-mates or people from his university or any other college for that matter. He doesn’t really blog, though he could be found here.

Here, he talks about the conflicts in ideologies between Gandhi and Anna. Read on.

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Source: Google Images

Had the familiar figure of “Munnabhai Lagey Raho’s” Gandhi’s phantom met Anna today, what possibly would they have talked? Would the two old men discuss forgiveness, punishment or their ideas’ superiority over the other?

While Gandhi became a Mahatma by his service to the needy, and strengthened them from inside he did not believe in just ‘organising’ rallies. His methods were clear- “I follow my conscience, and the ones awakened by my call follow me.” At no point in his life, did he resort to accusations of the British. What he did however was do the right thing the right way-his way. People stood up against him and he gave himself no day to rest to take a break. His actions were little different inside and outside the jail that he entered and exited quite regularly- spinning the charkha and doing his common chores himself. The old- figure kept walking with only a stick to support him and the nation followed. The independence was hard to come but eventually it did. Gandhi was Mahatma to the world and a common man to himself. His visions were bold but the methods too novice. It was no doubt a blot in India’s history when he muttered ‘Hey Ram.’

Years passed and generations changed. We came to saw another movement that reminded us of our freedom struggle. The struggle for independence had begun again, with hopes that it does not take a two century period to accomplish the job left undone. The methods were different, the euphoria was different, and the old man in his ‘I am Anna’ cap would walk out of air conditioned SUVs to address the media. The words were stronger, the allegations intense. What followed was unpredictable –a split in the movement, discontent in ideologies of the various factions and reports of individual ridicule among team members. The news channels who apotheosised the same Gandhian figure to Mahatma’s stature would grill him with gruesome questions and his actions’ credibility. The figure was reduced to null after a year of limelight. And the viewers too are content with the hotter topics of the ruling party’s leader’s son in law. The shift in focus reflects our mercurial nature. What we said yesterday no longer holds valid, and after all we have to move on. Surely this was the attitude that is attributed for our two century long captivity. But servile attitudes die hard, and for people like us, sab chalta hai.

It’s high time we realise who we raise to the statures of our freedom struggle heroes, and if we do, we respect their ideals and struggles. The independence came when the country’s poorest joined the struggle and, in its true meaning shared the struggle with their life. Only if we learn from our counterparts seventy decades back in time can we see another wave of unrest sweep a revolution and see ourselves deserve  the ‘Anna cap,’ for it’s not ballyhoo but transformation what our leaders wish.

History repeats itself

Nitesh Chaudhary belongs to the 2K10/EEE batch of the Delhi Technological University/ Delhi College of Engineering. He many-a-times happens to board the same metro as me and that does lead to some fruitful-mostly-political discussions. He also has a knack to find people to debate with other than his batch-mates or people from his university or any other college for that matter. He doesn’t really blog, though he could be found here.

In this post he talks about the UPA, the opposition and the IAC. Read on.

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English: India Against Corruption - Protestors...
English: India Against Corruption – Protestors in Pune,India. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

With the latest economic reforms from a battered UPA, one fails to speculate how the government would traverse the next two years in the media‘s relentless quest to reach a conclusion. The government, for one, made a history in its incumbent eight years rule by showing its dexterity in not just plundering the nation in scams but by never taking a stand on its involvement in the same. This surely proves two points, one that the Opposition is at an all-time low for it is even weaker (read ‘unpopular’), that it has been unable to hide, than the government, openly criticized by the public, and two, that the UPA has really good men at  job.

No doubt we trust all our politicians to be as ‘good’ as other for their glibness when it comes to ‘corruption’ or ‘no-development’ policies or their justification, but the present government sets an example for the politicians’ grand and great grand children(read future politicians) of basking in the corruption’s warmth with no worries of sunburns. The Opposition which is in its worst ever crisis with no clear leadership and with all aspiring leaders have been poked every time they tried to take an advantage of the government’s weaknesses. Hence, the most creative solution in recent trouble times for the UPA, with Corruption-crusader, IAC taking the limelight- ‘sit quiet and watch the fight’. The possible reason for the opposition to resort to this terrible numbness, it seems is, their goose bumps as they see themselves as the next party to lead the nation. So what is actually silence seems empathy for the UPA. But that does not stop the IAC from making open claims of possession of proofs and even display in the media against the purported disproportions within the UPA. With private-enterprises of the size of DLF being challenged in the face, the movement has earned discontent within the high echelons, if not a support from all masses, as was speculated.

The ‘grand men’ in the government deserve a special mention in IAC’s history books for the future generations for being the Colonial rulers in Indian skins. The men have implemented the ‘division-policy’ (based on caste, religion, and ethnicity) and the ‘plunder-policy’ with utmost perfection. And if you speak ill of it (actually elucidate the facts), you may well bank upon landing into jail for the trivialities of even making a cartoon. The appalling moment among all concerns not the political parties but us. I fail to understand the limits of our patience. If a commoner in the west were told of our Rulers, he surely deserves our sympathy (and not the opposite).

The law and order test, in my views, is passing through a crucial time in difficult contours, and the present day spectators shall be hopeful for a better outcome in days to come. A brief quote from an opposition leader epitomises my views on the same-” The country today is ruled not by laws, but by in-laws.”